Whether or not you’re an avid reader, you’re bound to have walked past some of Gabriel García Márquez’s work such as Love in the Time of Cholera and One Hundred Years of Solitude while browsing through your local bookstore. 

Gabriel García Márquez in Monterrey in 2007. Photograph: Tomas Bravo/Reuters via The Guardian
Gabriel García Márquez in Monterrey in 2007. Photograph: Tomas Bravo/Reuters via The Guardian

The Colombian Nobel Laureate who made the world fall in love with Spanish language literature and popularised “magic realism”, a writing technique that combines both magical and realistic elements simultaneously, has died at the age of 87. He was admitted to hospital on April 3rd with pneumonia.

In 1981, Garcia Marquez won the Nobel Prize for Literature. Gabo, as he was affectionately known throughout Latin America, was the first Colombian and fourth Latin American to win a Nobel Prize for Literature.

Photo via thebooklion.wordpress.com
Photo via thebooklion.wordpress.com

Around the world, presidents, celebrities and just about anyone who has ever been captivated by his works mourned the literary giant’s death.

Barack Obama said the world had lost “one of its greatest visionary writers”, adding that he cherished an inscribed copy of One Hundred Years of Solitude, presented to him by the author on a visit to Mexico. “I offer my thoughts to his family and friends, whom I hope take solace in the fact that Gabo’s work will live on for generations to come.”

Colombian president Juan Manuel Santos said yesterday via Twitter: “A thousand years of solitude and sadness at the death of the greatest Colombian of all time. Solidarity and condolences to his wife and family … Such giants never die.”

“We will remember your life, dear Gabo, like a unique and unrepeatable gift, and the most original of stories”, wrote Colombian singer Shakira who is a judge on The Voice.

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